How is Schedule Loss of Use Determined?

When you are injured in a workplace accident, your injuries may result in a permanent partial disability. Your injuries may be classified as either schedule loss of use or non-schedule. Determining which category your injuries fall into helps in determining how long you will be compensated for. When an employee’s injuries are considered a schedule loss of use, it is important to determine the percentage of loss.

Some of the body parts that are included in the schedule loss of use are an arm, leg, foot, face, hand, vision loss, hearing loss, toe, finger, joint, and more. In order to obtain a schedule loss of use award, you will have to have a doctor determine that the injured body part can not be improved through medical treatment and that it will be permanently damaged a certain percentage. Arms result in 312 maximum weeks of compensation, legs result in 288 weeks, hands in 244 weeks, and the list goes on in descending order.

For example, if you lost 50 percent of the use of your leg, you will receive 2.3 of your usual compensation for 50 percent of 288 weeks, which is 144 weeks. So if usually, you make $1,000 a week, you will earn $660 for 144 weeks. This amounts to a total of $95,040.

This breakdown can be confusing so you may want to consult with an experienced workers’ compensation attorney that can assess your situation and give you an idea of what to expect. If you have been injured in a workplace accident, contact the Law Offices of George Poulos to schedule a free consultation to discuss your Workers’ Compensation case today.

The Law Offices of George Poulos is an experienced Workers’ Compensation, personal injury, bankruptcy, and Social Security Disability law firm with offices in Queens and the Bronx. If you require strong legal representation, contact our firm today to schedule a free consultation.

This blog post was written on behalf of the Law Offices of George Poulos by Accel Marketing Solutions, Inc.